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Project Notes

#260 SaleaeLogic

Checking out a second-hand Saleae Logic (a 24 MS/s, 8 channel USB logic analyzer - that works on a Mac!!).

Build

Notes

I recently had a Saleae Logic fall into my hands - it’s an old model and was looking for a good home.

It is similar to the current range of products, but lower specs:

  • USB 2.0
  • 24 MS/s
  • 8 digital channels

I was a little curious, but didn’t expect much since it was a discontinued product, and I wasn’t even sure if I could find the right software to make it go.

While playing with the M62429 today, I thought “why not give the Logic a go”.

And I was very pleasantly surprised. Saleae have done a brilliant job of creating an excellent experience, and continuing to support their discontinued products.

I was up and running in about 30 seconds!

I think this device just went from being a curiosity to something I can see my self reaching for quite frequently.

Software

This put a smile on my face … go to Saleae Downloads, and they have a good looking site that recognises me as a MacOSX user and offers to download Version 1.2.10 for Mac OSX 10.7 Lion+. If only more electronics equipment manufactururs would come to the multi-platform party!

The software installed like a “real” Mac app, and immediately recognised the old Logic when I plugged it into the USB. Here’s my first trace. Unfortunately not a standard I2C or SPI protocol so I’m not sure how well the protocol recognition/analysis works yet.

custom_serial_protocol_example

The USB device profile as it shows up on my machine:

Logic:

  Product ID: 0x3881
  Vendor ID:  0x0925
  Version:  0.00
  Speed:  Up to 480 Mb/sec
  Manufacturer: Saleae LLC
  Location ID:  0x14520000 / 23
  Current Available (mA): 500
  Current Required (mA):  100

SaleaeLogic_test

Credits and References

About LEAP#260 ToolsTest EquipmentLogic Analyzer
Project Source on GitHub Return to the LEAP Catalog

This page is a web-friendly rendering of my project notes shared in the LEAP GitHub repository.

LEAP is my personal collection of electronics projects, usually involving an Arduino or other microprocessor in one way or another. Some are full-blown projects, while many are trivial breadboard experiments, intended to learn and explore something interesting (IMHO!).

The projects are usually inspired by things found wild on the net, or ideas from the sources such as:

Feel free to borrow liberally, and if you spot any issues do let me know. See the individual projects for credits where due. There are even now a few projects contributed by others - send your own over in a pull request if you would also like to add to this collection.